Posts tagged: France

Harvest Time in the South of France 2010

It’s harvest time in most parts of the Languedoc and Roussillon.  Thank you for being so understanding of my on-and-off blogging throughout the harvest and vinification season.  I won’t have enough time to do much traveling or video.  What I can do is show you all the great work on other winemaker blogs in the region!

I’ve decided to round up all the best 2010 harvest blogging from the Languedoc Roussillon.  And there’s a lot to choose from, as you will see!  This is a region full of winemakers who are proud of their work and know how to communicate online even at the busiest time of year.

Click on any photo to be linked directly to the source at the winemaker’s website or social media profile.

Les Caves de Trinques Fougasses have started visiting vineyards like Mas de Mortiès to talk shop about topics like harvest technique:

and more technical stuff like how this year’s concentrated small berry harvest will translate in terms of volume of finished wine.  Smaller fruit means a totally different liquid volume to solid volume ratio and you end up with much less wine per tank.  Also, there are crazy pockets of much more concentrated fruit that have started to dry out and they will be very sweet without much juice at all.

Some fun videos showing process at Mas de l’Ecriture with some very funny music choices:

And one video I took at Virgile Joly’s vineyard when I stayed at his new Vinolodge project which Ill tell you all about later!
Les vendanges sont en cour dans toutes parties du Languedoc Roussillon.  Je vous remerci pour votre patience avec mon absence durant cet periode tres occupée des vendanges.

J’ai pas beaucoup de temps pour faire des voyages ou des videos.  Par contre, je suis ravi de rassembler le travail d’autres vignerons de la région.

Voila le meilleur des Vendanges 2010 sur Internet.

Cliquez sur n’importe quel photo pour retrouver la source sur le site web du vigneron ou son profile reseaux sociaux.

Les Caves de Trinques Fougasses have started visiting vineyards like Mas de Mortiès to talk shop about topics like harvest technique:

and more technical stuff like how this year’s concentrated small berry harvest will translate in terms of volume of finished wine.  Smaller fruit means a totally different liquid volume to solid volume ratio and you end up with much less wine per tank.  Also, there are crazy pockets of much more concentrated fruit that have started to dry out and they will be very sweet without much juice at all.

Some fun videos showing process at Mas de l’Ecriture with some very funny music choices:

And one video I took at Virgile Joly’s vineyard when I stayed at his new Vinolodge project which Ill tell you all about later!

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Wine Tourism at the Grenache Symposium – Love that Languedoc

A subject that came up a lot at the Grenache Symposium was oenotourism, or wine tourism.  The idea is that tourism creates potential fans and potential ambassadors of your wine.  If there’s one thing better than somebody who drinks your wine, it’s somebody who gets all their friends to drink your wine too!

So there are two little clips I want to show.

In one clip, Reva K Singh discusses the possibility of creating a capital for Grenache.  By creating a sort of Ground Zero for Grenache, she can motivate her readership in India to travel to that capital with the specific goal of tasting delicious Grenache.

We talked about a lot of different areas that were viable candidates to be the “capital” of Grenache.  While I want to say it’s the Roussillon or Catalunya, I understand that we can’t hog all the glory in the Languedoc-Roussillon.  It might actually make more sense to favor an idea that the Mediterranean is the “capital” of Grenache.  Mediterranean vacations speak to people all over the world as a sort of luxurious vacation spot.  That high-profile can benefit the grape more than just saying the name of one city or one specific appellation like Chateauneuf du Pape.

Maybe this is a place for umbrella brands like Sud de France.  That name is a lot catchier than Languedoc and it encompasses a lot of the Mediterranean wine producing regions.  But then maybe it would alienate our friends in the Priorat and other Grenache producers who don’t consider themselves French.

I wonder if Australians, Americans, South Africa and everybody else producing delicious Grenache far from the Mediterranean would be okay with this idea.

Then Robert Joseph had an interesting bit to say about the lack of well-developed wine tourism in France.  And this hits home.  We really have a responsibility to set up an infrastructure for tourists who want to come to our country and taste wine.  It’s our responsibility!  I might translate this into French, because it will do more good in French than in English.

But anyway, Joseph talks about how French wine tourism is lacking and how we can learn a lot by observing Lafitte’s efforts in China. There’s money and power in tourism.  It could be a major source of income for winemakers in the near future.

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Winemakers address the longevitiy of Grenache at Grenache Symposium – Love That Languedoc Episode 62

Here we have one of TWO epic panel of winemakers at the Grenache Symposium held in the Rhone last week. The Q&A can get a little dry at times, but I think some of you will appreciate it. If it gets too technical, feel free to fast forward through the video to see other people talk.

I think the most interesting thing about this footage is that it shows the huge amount of knowledge and detail that went into the Symposium. This was not a fluff-oriented conference. We had a group that truly understands the strengths and challenges facing Grenache grapes around the world. If anything, posting video from the Symposium is making me realize that we need to do a sort of entry-level translation for people who just like wine. More on this to follow.

The people who talk in this video include:
Ray O’Connor, wine writer of the year and my name nemesis, asks “What is the ageability of Grenache as a single varietal and as a blend?”
Randall Grahm, winemaker at Bonny Doon, answers by talking about the hidden power of Grenache
Vincent Avril, of Clos des Papes, gets into some of the details about blended Grenache in Chateauneuf du Pape
Chester Osborn, from d’Arenberg, talks about how Grenache responds to vintages in Australia
Eben Sadie, from Terroir Al Limit Soc. Lda and Sequillo Cellars, talks about making single estate Grenache in Priorat and South Africa and the challenges involved in single varietal Grenache and ripeness
Philippe Cambie, winemaker in Chateauneuf du Pape and around the south of France, talks about the effect of fermenting with stems versus destemming
Hervé Bizeul asks about the proper level of volatile acids in a good grenache and a great grenache
Cambie coyly answers that the good level is the one you have when you finish fermenting, wherever it is.
Tim Atkin asks if there is any place in the world where Grenache should be grown where it is not already grown
Cambie coyly answers “In my garden.”

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Birds fly south – Love That Languedoc, Nota Bene

Une migrqtion d’étourneau!

A bonus episode.  A little while ago, I was eating lunch with some folks at the winery and this huge starling migration swept in over the vineyard.  The birds were gorgeous, forming amazingly intricate yet simple sheets of black in the sky above us.  Worth going to full screen:

So ya, I ran outside with my Flip and filmed this big bird migration and it was awesome.  I gasp with delight at one part, but otherwise this is no comment news.  Just appreciate the wildlife as it sweeps across the vineyard on its journey south. I got mud all over my fancy shoes just for y’all.

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