Posts tagged: family

AOC La Clape Château de Camplazens – Love that Languedoc Episode 30

My parents and I taste three AOC La Clape wines from Château de Camplazens. While we all have a clear favorite, tasting all three wines proves to be very educational and entertaining.

We talk about some questions we have about carbonic maceration, both the process and its effect on the wine, and we discuss Christmas and muggings and whatnot. I should’ve posted this closer to the holidays but there was a huge queue and I didn’t want to skip Camplazens to the front of the line. Anyway, enjoy that Languedoc!

Les vins:
Guarrigue 2006, Château Camplazens, AOC La Clape
Réserve 2006, Château Camplazens, AOC La Clape
Prestige 2007, Château Camplazens, AOC La Clape

See Also:
La Clape – An Appellation d’Origine Controlée that takes its name from an occitan phrase that means something close to “pile of rocks”. It’s near the Mediterranean coast and pretty high in altitude. They get very rich, spicy wines with a surprising amount of freshness.

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Les Trois Maries de Domaine Thunevin-Calvet – Love That Languedoc episode 24

We finish up our New Year’s tasting of Thunevin-Calvet, an estate in the Maury sort of on the cusp between Languedoc and Roussillon. Make sure you’ve watched the first part of this wine tasting.

If there’s one thing to take away from this tasting it’s that Maury doesn’t just do the doux.  They can make excellent, KILLER dry red wines. Great way to start the new year.

We also spend some time reflecting on how some of these Languedoc wines would make a might fine cellar.  For a reasonable investment today, you could have a goldmine cellar in ten-fifteen years.  Something to think about.  Especially if you have a toddler.  Get some wine from their birth vintage.  What a great excuse to start a cellar stock.  And you won’t constantly be tempted to drink the wine because you’re saving it until they’re old enough to drink it with you!

The wines:
Constance 2007, Domaine Thunevin-Calvet, Vin de Pays des Côtes Catalanes
Les Dentelles 2006, Domaine Thunevin-Calvet, AOC Côtes du Roussillon Villages
Les Trois Maries 2007, Domaine Thunevin-Calvet, AOC Côtes du Roussillon Villages

See also:

Garage winemakers – These guys make small quantities of great wine.  Here is a Grand Crew post about meeting Thunevin (and Michel Gracia, another great garage winemaker).  Thunevin’s a partner in the Maury property with Jean Roger Calvet, and they make Garagiste quality wine in slightly more conventional quantities.

Jean Luc Thunevin’s English-language blog – He is one of the first garagistes or garage winemakers in Bordeaux. He’s gotten a lot of grief for his unyielding pursuit of the best wine a terroir can give (even when it directly contradicts the classification laws).

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Thunevin-Calvet – Love that Languedoc episode 22

Happy New Year! My parents and I open a couple of really good bottles from Thunevin-Calvet. Or is it Calvet-Thunevin? The labels say one thing and the corks say another. But maybe that’s the point; it’s a perfect partnership. Neither person has to come first.

This is an epic partnership. Calvet is a great winemaker with a really good grasp of what you can do in Maury. Thunevin is a great winemaker in other regions and a very astute business man. And neither man is going to let any rules or traditions get in the way of making really really good wine.

Maury is a region well known for doux wines with their residual sugars. But Calvet-Thunevin make big old dry reds. They have a doux, and it’s good, but their dry reds are where it’s at.

The French episodes will include the winemaker, Jean Roger Calvet. But for now, you have to watch my parents and I taste three of the dry reds. Very good stuff.

edit: Be sure to watch part two of our Thunevin-Calvet tasting.

Their entry-level 6 Euro wine is an outstanding value. Their more expensive wines are also worth the bucks. This is a property real far to the south, actually in The Pyrenées Orientales departement of France. But they still consider themselves Languedoc.

We talk a lot about the varietals in the episode and so let me clarify: The first two wines are Grenache-Carignan blends and the Trois Maries is predominant Grenache. The 2007 actually has a tiny bit of Syrah in it too.

The wines:
Constance 2007, Domaine Thunevin-Calvet, Vin de Pays des Côtes Catalanes
Les Dentelles 2006, Domaine Thunevin-Calvet, AOC Côtes du Roussillon Villages
Les Trois Maries 2007, Domaine Thunevin-Calvet, AOC Côtes du Roussillon Villages

See also:

Garage winemakers – People who make wine in such small quantities that a critic derided “they could make that wine in a garage”.  They tend to be individualists with properties in less noble parts of very noble regions.  They tend to make really good wines that are hard to find due to the small quantity and high demand.  I really like this GrapeRadio interview with Maltus that sort of highlights some of the stuff garagistes are associated with.  edit: And this Grand Crew post about meeting Thunevin (and Michel Gracia, another great garage winemaker).

Jean Luc Thunevin’s English-language blog – He is one of the first garagistes or garage winemakers in Bordeaux. He’s gotten a lot of grief for his unyielding pursuit of the best wine a terroir can give (even when it directly contradicts the classification laws).

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Visiting Mas Daumas Gassac with Aimé Guibert – Love that Languedoc Ep 18

Thanks for all your patience, Anglophones. I finally edited down the video from my visit with Aime Guibert AND I subtitled it. Some of the subtitles pass by a little bit too quickly, but you can use that pause button to your heart’s content (or watch it a hundred times). I think Aimé is just a fascinating character and I hope the edited down version retains all the charm, humor and tragedy of the original unedited footage of our Daumas Gassac tasting.

You should also note that I take some liberties in the translations. “Ils n’en ont rien à foutre” is somewhere between “They don’t give a shit” and “They don’t give a fuck.” I went with my gut, and my gut was being especially lewd.

Now, our car ride with Aimé was very fun, but we also had a treat waiting for us in the winery where we did a tasting of three Mas Daumas Gassac wines. These are wines that are very hard to taste so young, but very interesting. Over all, I was impressed but I really want to see where the wines go in ten years or so. I guess that’s kind of the magic of Daumas Gassac. Aimé Guibert was one of the first pioneers with the guts to say he could make a vin de pays de l’Herault that was good enough to make people cellar it for at least a decade. Enjoy!

The wines:
Mas Daumas Gassac Rosé Frizant 2008, Mas de Daumas Gassac, Vin de Pays de l’Herault
Mas Daumas Gassac Blanc 2008, Mas de Daumas Gassac, Vin de Pays de l’Herault
Mas Daumas Gassac Rouge 2007, Mas de Daumas Gassac, Vin de Pays de l’Herault

A note on pricing: Gassac is suprisingly affordable if you buy it ahead of time. They make amazing prices for their futures. Whereas, waiting for it to appear in stores, you’ll typically pay upwards of 80 Euros. At the futures prices, you are getting amazing bang for your buck. Another thing… I got some sticker shock from that bubbly rosé at 12€. Not unreasonably priced, but it’s a playful wine and a serious price. Surprised me a tiny bit. But the red and white at the futures prices! Those are awesome.

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